China: A shameful tradition of tainted food

Published on Taipei Times
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/editorials/archives/2008/10/17/2003426151

EDITORIAL: A shameful tradition of tainted food

Friday, Oct 17, 2008, Page 8

In China, tasteless and colorless melamine has been part of the food chain for a long time. Its addition to Sanlu’s milk powder has now created a global panic over contaminated Chinese foodstuffs.

And this was not the first time.

In May last year, companies in China’s Jiangsu and Shandong provinces added melamine to wheat protein and barley protein powder, which caused thousands of pets in the US, Canada and other countries to fall ill or die.

More than 60 million pet food products were recalled. Feed for 20 million chickens, hundreds of thousands of cultivated fish and thousands of pigs was also contaminated with melamine.

The immediate reaction by the Chinese authorities to the allegations of poisonous animal food was strong denial, and it was only when the US insisted that it be involved and sent representatives to China to take samples that the scandal was exposed.

So what did the Chinese authorities learn from that incident? Nothing.

In the most recent crisis, local governments continued to offer denials even after New Zealand company Fonterra Co-operative Group used diplomatic channels to put pressure directly on the Chinese government. It is well-known within the Chinese industry that melamine is added to milk powder, vegetable proteins, processed food products and animal feed. The government knows it and tolerates it.

Melamine is one of many harmful additives, and even if the melamine problem were eliminated, other hazardous substances could be added to products.

On Wednesday, frozen green beans imported from China to Japan were found to contain 34,500 times the amount of pesticides allowed in Japan. The government immediately ordered a recall.

There is no end to all the problems with Chinese food products.

Importing countries must pressure China and demand that it meet its responsibilities by strengthening procedures to manage, inspect and ban contaminated food products and thus control the export of toxic food.

Taiwan’s Bureau of Standards, Metrology and Inspection and the Department of Health should meet their control responsibilities and implement stricter sampling of raw materials imported finished or semi-finished.

The government should amend the Commodity Labeling Act (商品標示法) to require that, in addition to listing manufacturing country, contents and nutritional value, labels also show the production process at the place of origin for raw materials to that consumers can make an informed choice as to the safety of a specific product.

Although China’s Taiwan Affairs Office spokesperson Yang Yi (楊毅) said China would handle the milk powder incident satisfactorily and demanded that Duqing Co in Shandong send representatives to Taiwan to investigate its export of dairy creamer here, he has kept mum on the issue of compensation to the victims, which displays a total lack of sincerity.

The milk powder scandal has had a serious economic impact on the companies involved as well as public health in Taiwan.

The Taiwanese government and private sectors must demand compensation from the Chinese government and manufacturers.

If China does not provide an adequate response to compensation demands in a timely manner, Chinese products should be boycotted and people should take to the streets to protest when Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Strait Chairman Chen Yunlin (陳雲林) visits Taipei.

A Protest Against China by an Animal Lover

August 1, 2008 by Gyvel Young © 2014  
Filed under Animal Atrocities, CRUELTY WATCH

Cat is beaten in a sack while this one watches, knowing he is next. To the Chinese torture is part of the killing, they say that torture brings out better flavor.

Cat is beaten in a sack while this one watches, knowing he is next. To the Chinese torture is part of the killing, they say that torture brings out better flavor.

Cats awaiting their fate at a Chinese meat market..

Cats awaiting their fate at a Chinese meat market..

Cat being pulled from cage so he can be tortured to death. Prolonged death means better tasting meat. Beating is the usual method, it  prolonges the agony and intensifies the "flavor."

Cat being pulled from cage so he can be tortured to death. Prolonged death means better tasting meat. Beating is the usual method, it prolonges the agony and intensifies the "flavor."

Butchered cats hanging on meat hooks to intice hungry customers.

Butchered cats hanging on meat hooks to intice hungry customers.

Dogs caged at the meat market awaiting their fate. Usually being clubed to death with long poles. The Chinese actually take a paculiar delight in torturing their dinner victims before butchering them and eating them.

Dogs caged at the meat market awaiting their fate. Usually being clubed to death with long poles. The Chinese actually take a particuliar delight in torturing their dinner victims before butchering them and eating them.

Here is an actual photo of a hog-tied dog being beaten to death to bring out the "flavor" of the meat. It is also a delightful spectator sport since people at the market gather around with smiles and giggles delighting in the torture of the victim.

Here is an actual photo of a dog being hog-tied so it can be beaten to death to bring out the "flavor" of the meat. It is also a delightful spectator sport since people at the market gather around with smiles and giggles delighting in the torture of the victim.

Bred and housed in warehouses for the dinner table these dogs have never seen the light of day or known the kindness of a human being. Man's best friend? Sure, if you are dog and lucky enought to be born in China you can be man's best meal.

Bred and housed in warehouses for the dinner table these dogs have never seen the light of day or known the kindness of a human being. Man's best friend? Sure, if you are dog and lucky enough to be born in China you can be man's best meal.

A vendor skins dogs at a food market in Nanjing, Jiangsu province June 12, 2008. Dog meat has long been a popular delicacy in China, and is commonly known as "fragrant meat". REUTERS/Sean Yong (CHINA)

A vendor skins dogs at a food market in Nanjing, Jiangsu province June 12, 2008. Dog meat has long been a popular delicacy in China, and is commonly known as "fragrant meat". REUTERS/Sean Yong (CHINA)

More dogs hanging from meat racks awaiting their ultimate trip to the food bowl, Chinese style.

More dogs hanging from meat racks awaiting their ultimate trip to the food bowl, Chinese style.

China’s True Heritage Passed On From One Generation To Another: Eating Dog And Cat—Ancient Chinese Custom!

I have seen and heard just about enough about all the hoopla of the Bejiing Olympics. First, let me state that I am embarrassed that a civilized country like America would even participate in ANY event hosted by the Chinese. China may very well be growing into an economic giant, all thanks to America and Europe. It may have modern cities, transportation, computers,video games, plasma television, ipods and all the other electronic gizmos of a “progressive” nation. But take a look around and what you will find is a nation whose government keeps their people suppressed politically, religiously, and physically.

It is a nation whose government not only scorns the rights of humans but of animals. It is a nation that views human life as an expendable commodity. Hence it should come as no surprise that animals regarded by Western Society as pets are food to these people. Dogs primary purpose to the Chinese are food and fur. They are caged and bred to be slaughtered for food or to adorn a coat that will be imported into America, Europe or Russia. Cats don’t fare any better.

Let’s not cringe at that because the Chinese do not hesitate to eat anything that most other cultures would find offensive: donkey penis, rats, cats, dogs, various fetuses, preserved “rotten” eggs, bird nest soup, and the list goes on and on. Their meat markets are filled with caged dogs, cats, and other animals all witnessing the slaughter of their cage-mates while awaiting their turn.

The carnage gets even worse when you look at their fur-trade practices. And yes, if you wear a fur-trimmed parka you are more than likely wearing a dog fur or cat fur imported directly from China. Why do you think all our clothes are imported? American clothing manufacturers can’t make clothes from dogs and cats but it certainly can IMPORT them. No questions asked. Consumers don’t mind, they don’t even bother looking into where their nice inexpensive (and sometimes not so inexpensive) fur-trimmed coat was made.

Let’s add the fact that thanks to China thousands of Americans lost their beloved pets due to contaminated pet food. The Menu Foods company imported tainted wheat gluten from China. And the Chinese KNEW it was tainted. But why would they care? They probably figured it was rather humorous to provide tainted ingredients to an American company that makes food for one of their own food products.

Additional thanks goes out to the Chinese for manufacturing toys for our pets and children using toxic lead paint. Why would Americans think that the Chinese regulate these things? They have no regulations!

Of course we are dealing with a nation that has practiced selling their female children into slavery for centuries. If the girls aren’t sold then they are killed at birth. It’s called infanticide.

More kudos to the Chinese for their marvelous pirating skills. They pirate software and market it as the REAL thing. They pirate movie DVDs, music CDs and again the list goes on and on.

Then there’s the crowing achievement of the Chinese: cyber sabotage. The barrage of spam, server infiltration, and hacking that goes on originates in China. It keeps the I.T. people busy and it stops up the flow of Western productivity.

Is this making you uncomfortable? Well that’s good! It’s time Americans took a stand against companies that import goods or manufacture their products in China. Why would we want to support this nation? Why would we want to support these companies? As far as I’m concerned this “Most Favored Nation” status of China should be changed to “Most Hated Nation.”

For more information on the subject of dog and cat eating in the Asian countries please visit Animals Asia Foundation. PLEASE offer your support!

Korea is another dog and cat eating country. Contrary to myth Korea does not have a cultural culinary heritage of eating dogs and cats. This is a relatively new phenomena promoted by purveyors of dog and cat meat. This is because dog meat production is cheap to produce—a dog can be slaughtered at the age of 4 months. While Korea banned dog meat it is now in the process of reclassifying dogs as “livestock.”

Animal Cruelty - Chinese Fur Farms

April 1, 2008 by Editor  
Filed under CRUELTY WATCH, Fur Trade Horrors

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