Mars Petcare US Announces Extension of Voluntary Pet Food Recall

November 25, 2008 by Editor  
Filed under ANIMAL NEWZ, CONSUMER REPORTS, Pet Food Recalls

Mars Petcare Announces Extension of Voluntary Pet Food Recall

Click on a logo below to see if your products are affected:

Contact:
Contact: Debra Fair at (973) 691- 3536

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Franklin, Tennessee (November 25, 2008) —Today, Mars Petcare US announced an extension of a previously announced voluntary recall of dry cat and dog food products manufactured at its Allentown, Pennsylvania facility with “Best By” dates between August 11, 2009 – October 3, 2009. The pet food is being voluntarily recalled because of potential contamination with Salmonella. This voluntary recall affects product sold at BJ’s Wholesale Club, ShopRite Supermarkets, and Wal-mart locations in Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and West Virginia.

Salmonella can cause serious infections in dogs and cats, and, if there is cross contamination caused by handling of the pet food, in people as well, especially children, the aged, and people with compromised immune systems. Healthy people potentially infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. On rare occasions, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Animals can be carriers with no visible symptoms and potentially infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

This action is an extension of the voluntary recall issued on October 27, 2008 of all sizes of SPECIAL KITTY® Gourmet Blend dry cat food produced at the Allentown facility on August 11, 2008. We recently learned that an additional sample of SPECIAL KITTY® made on September 25, 2008 at the Allentown facility tested positive for Salmonella. There have been no reported cases of human or pet illness caused by Salmonella associated with products produced at this facility. Mars Petcare US is taking an additional precautionary action to protect pets and their owners by extending the October 27, 2008 voluntary recall to include all dry pet food product produced at the facility with “Best By” dates between August 11, 2009 and October 3, 2009.

Recalled Pet Food

The dry cat and dog food listed below are made at our Allentown facility and sold at BJ’s Wholesale Club, ShopRite Supermarkets, and Wal-mart locations in Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and West Virginia.

All code dates, regardless of brand, are listed in a similar format as noted below:
Consumers should look for “50” as the first two digits of the second line.
Best By AUG 15 09 (Sample)
50 1445 1

PRODUCT NAME

UPC CODE

Berkley & Jensen Bistro Blend Premium Cat Food 21.6#

00000 20052

Berkley & Jensen Small Bites & Bones Dog Food 52#

00000 14958

Ol’ Roy Puppy Complete Premium Dog Food 4#

81131 79078

Ol’ Roy Puppy Complete Premium Dog Food 20#

81131 79080

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 4#

81131 17550

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 4.4#

81131 69377

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 8#

05388 67144

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 20#

81131 17549

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 22#

05388 60342

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 44.1#

81131 17551

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 50#

78742 01022

Ol’ Roy High Performance Premium Dog Food 20#

05388 60345

Ol’ Roy High Performance Premium Dog Food 50#

78742 05815

Ol’ Roy Meaty Chunks & Gravy Premium Dog Food 22#

81131 69630

Ol’ Roy Meaty Chunks & Gravy Premium Dog Food 50#

81131 69631

ShopRite Crunchy Bites, Bones and Healthy Squares Dog Food 20#

41190 04521

Special Kitty Original Premium Cat Food 3.5#

81131 17557

Special Kitty Original Premium Cat Food 7#

81131 17562

Special Kitty Original Premium Cat Food 18#

81131 17559

Special Kitty Gourmet Blend Premium Cat Food 3.5#

81131 17546

Special Kitty Gourmet Blend Premium Cat Food 7#

81131 17547

Special Kitty Gourmet Blend Premium Cat Food 18#

81131 17548

Special Kitty Kitten Premium Cat Food 3.5#

81131 17553

Special Kitty Kitten Premium Cat Food 7#

81131 17554

In an effort to prevent the transmission of Salmonella from pets to family members and care givers, the FDA recommends that everyone follow appropriate pet food handling guidelines when feeding their pets. A list of safe pet food handling tips can be found at: http://www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/petfoodtips080307.html

Pet owners who have questions about the recall should call 1-877-568-4463 or visit www.petcare.mars.com.

Salmonella: The new bane of the pet food industry?

What’s a Pet Parent to Do?

Salmonella has reared its ugly head again, this time in the Hartz Mountain Rawhide Chips. I am not a big advocate of feeding dogs rawhide or pig ears: They are indigestible, some occurrences of intestinal blockage have been reported, and some dogs (when left unsupervised) have choked on them. In addition, some of these products use animal parts from Asia or other third-world countries. These countries do not regulate pesticides, chemicals, or sanitation. Even if the hides are from the United States the chews could be processed in a foreign country. Arsenic is just one of the harmful substances used in rawhide processing, another is bleaching solutions (to make the hide white). Unfortunately, dog owners are blissfully unaware of this and they continue to give Fido these treats. It’s not that dog parents want to give their four-pawed pals something harmful, it’s just that most people believe these products wouldn’t be on the market if they were dangerous. And yet, time and time again the pet product industry breaks this trust.

You might recall that back in August another outbreak of Salmonella turned up in pet food. This time it was the Mars Petcare US company. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) discovered a link between Salmonella Schwarzengrund, pet food, and an outbreak of Salmonella that affected sixty-six people and spanned 18 states. As it turns out, these people were affected by the exact same strain of Salmonella discovered in the Mars Petcare brand of Red Flannel Large Breed Adult Formula and the Krasdale Gravy kibble. The Pennsylvania Health Department also discovered traces of the strain at the Pennsylvania factory where the food was produced.

Mars was quick to act, recalling the food within a week of this discovery. Then once again in September another Mars Petcare US pet food recall was made. Again it was over “potential” salmonella contamination. This time a variety of their brands were affected and products in 31 states were pulled from the shelves.

No doubt about it, Salmonella is on the rise. In fact, the CDC reports that there are about 40,000 cases of Salmonella poisoning in the United States each year. That’s just the ones that are reported — milder cases are rarely reported — so it is difficult to state with certainty exactly how many cases actually occur each year. The problem is that Salmonella is highly transferable. That is, a person handling contaminated dog food can get it on their hands and accidentally ingest it. Another problem is that drug-resistant strains of Schwarzengrund Salmonella are increasing. And if a person contracts a drug-resistant variety they will require prolonged hospitalization. In some cases it results in death. As is usually the case with disease, the elderly and young are more likely to become victims. Furthermore, Schwarzengrund Salmonella can create multiple problems, even after a person recovers. One is Rieter’s Syndrome, an arthritis-like disease that causes painful joints, eye irritation, and painful urination.

On the whole, the frequency of Schwarzengrund Salmonella outbreaks is alarming. It reminds us to be cautious when handling all food products, including pet food. Certainly we need to take care in washing feeding bowls, utensils, and measuring cups. In addition, we want to caution small children about playing with pet food. Finally, as pet parents and consumers we want to educate ourselves about the food we are feeding our dogs and cats. Being enlightened will help us select the best quality of dog food or cat food for the four-pawed members of our family. It’s not just about our pets, Salmonella involves the human members of our family too. Let’s all wise up about pet food, take the time to investigate and research — after all, you wouldn’t put anything harmful into your baby’s mouth would you? By the same token, no loving pet parent would want to place harmful food into their furry baby’s bowl.

The Complete Scoop on the Pet Food, Toys, Treats, and Products.

From toys to food to treats to medications: this author reveals the truth about the pet food industry!

Susan Thixton, author and pet rights advocate, has done it again! Read her article entitled The FDA ignores Pet Food Safety Deadline in the American Chronicle where she reveals the agency’s stalling tactics on the FDA Amendments Act that required the FDA to develop “Early Warning Surveillance Systems and Notification During Pet Food Recall.”

Better yet, visit her web site where you will find out the truth about pet food, which just happens to be the name of her web site!

This site truly represents the rights of pets to have safe foods, treats, and toys. Just as human consumers need consumer watch guard groups, so do pets. In fact, pets need them more since many people consider them to be expendable commodities or property. Neither one of these view points is true. For those who share their lives with their dear furry, scaly, or feathered friends, pets are family members. They need to be protected from harmful substances, insecticides, pharmaceuticals, and foods, just as we would protect other members of our family from harm

Sign up for her PetSumer Report and stay informed!

On behalf of all the creatures thank you Susan!

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